Down at the Tank Museum

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I’ve never been to the wargaming show at the Tank Museum before and it has been many years since I last visited the actual museum, but this year I did manage to get down to Bovington.

There is something rather inspiring about visiting a gaming show amongst the many different kinds of tanks and armoured cars on show. It’s one thing to see a 15 mm Tortoise on the table in an 1947 game and then just on the other side of the museum is the real prototype.

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I probably spent more time looking at the exhibits than looking at the games or shopping, but there are some great exhibits. Those first tanks from The Great War were those that impressed me the most.

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These metal monsters designed in an era when they didn’t really know what they were doing and there was a lot of trial and error. The Mark IX reminds us that the APC is as old as the tank.

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The exhibition is great because you can get right up and close to the tanks and you get a much better understanding of the strength but also the weaknesses of the armoured fighting vehicle. You can see how tall the Sherman was for example and why those flat sides were a real target for the panzerfaust armed Germans.

Having recently enjoyed the film Fury it was great to see the real star of that film, the M4A3E8 Sherman.

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On the gaming front, there were some great games on display.

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Lots of traders there too ready to take your money, though I went with some ideas of getting some Sarissa Precision models they weren’t in stock and no one had any Copplestone Castings, so in the end I got one of the new 4Ground The Chicago Way buildings and some 28mm Edwardian policemen.

1914 British Officer

There are four metal models from this range on the workbench. I gave the models a white undercoat. Here is one of the models, an officer with a pistol.

1914 British Officer

1914 British Officer

1914 British Infantryman on guard with rifle and bayonet

There are four metal models from this range on the workbench. I gave the models a white undercoat. Here is one of the models, an infantryman on guard with rifle and bayonet.

1914 British Infantryman on guard with rifle and bayonet

1914 British Infantryman on guard with rifle and bayonet

I have been looking at a few online forums for guides on how to paint these. Going for a relatively simple and quick paint job, probably basecoat, webbing and other details, followed by a wash before final detailing.

1914 British Infantry

There are four metal models from this range on the workbench. I gave the models a white undercoat. Here is one of the models, an infantryman firing.

1914 British Infantry

1914 British Infantry

I will give the models a base coat of khaki next.

1914 British Infantry

I have four metal models from this range that I bought some time ago, not sure if that was the only ones I bought or if I have merely mislaid and lost the others…. I thought I had ten, but there are only four.

I gave the models a white undercoat. Here is one of the models, an infantryman advancing.

1914 British Infantry

I will give the models a base coat of khaki next.

1914 British Infantry

I have been thinking about how I might use the models once I have finished painting them. I did think they would work well in a Victorian Science Fiction Scenario alongside my Steam Tank.

Another idea was to use them in a Doctor Who scenario fighting the Robot Mummies or the Cybermen. They are almost the right era for the Robot Mummies and would make for an interesting pre-UNIT or even Torchwood scenario.